Why pricing by the bot doesn’t make sense

Walk into any event with a focus on robotic process automation (RPA) and you’ll undoubtedly hear people boasting about the awesome numbers of bots they’ve built. It can be entertaining, but it begs the question: Is quantity a good measure of success? It’s like the general bragging about the size of his army; what matters is not how many soldiers you have but whether you can win the war. 

When a company starts down the road of evaluating any sort of investment, their primary goal is to focus on outcomes. How it gets done is secondary. Do you want to drive more revenue? Increase efficiency? Decrease costs? It’s really about what you get at the end of the endeavor.

Imagine you’re an investor looking at two companies that produce widgets. One uses 100 employees to produce a widget and the other uses only two. You’d probably want to invest in the company that is more efficient and requires fewer resources to get the result done.

Bringing sanity to RPA pricing  

In RPA, wouldn’t it make sense to pay based on the number of processes automated, rather than by the bot? Whether it takes two or two hundred bots to complete the task in the timeframe required should be irrelevant. Especially if you’re hosting the bots on your own hardware, you – not the RPA vendor — should control how you use your IT resources. 

This is how Nintex thinks about pricing for our Nintex Foxtrot RPA solution. We price by the process automated, not by users or runs or bots. We let the customer choose how fast they want to go, and deploy as many bots as they want, without any additional costs.  

Sounds refreshingly simple, doesn’t it?

Compare this to the downright confusing world of RPA solutions in the market today. Horses for Sources recently had a great blog post about this very subject that I’d highly encourage you to read through.

Here’s are some of my takeaways from the article:

  • Vendors don’t use a standard unit of measure (a “bot” doesn’t necessarily equal a “bot”)
  • It is challenging to compare vendors due to different pricing configurations
  • There is little to no flexibility in pricing models
  • Software is only a small portion of the total cost of ownership

Simply put, your world is complex and convoluted enough. Why introduce more of it when it comes to evaluating RPA solutions?

 

Interested in learning more about Nintex Foxtrot RPA? Contact a Nintex representative today.

 

Jason Tillman

As a senior member of the Nintex product marketing team, Jason Tillman focuses on the financial services industry and helping companies within it automate, orchestrate, and optimize simple to sophisticated business processes through the use of intelligent process automation technology. He’s spent more than 15 years honing his craft at companies ranging from Microsoft and SAP Concur to small pre-IPO startups.