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Nintex World Tour: Streamlining Data Collection and Analysis

In this era of digital transformation, organizations are more empowered than ever by the flood of readily available data. However, seeing the full value of their data can be a challenge without well-defined methods of collection and analysis.

Here at Nintex, my team was recently tasked with creating a solution to standardize and streamline our process of collecting and analyzing feedback data from our Nintex World Tour. Our series of global events has spread the message of Intelligent Process Automation (IPA) in cities like Sydney, Singapore, Hong Kong, Abu Dhabi, Munich, London, Washington DC, and more. Our goal is to act on previous attendees’ feedback to put on the best events possible in the coming months as we travel to San Francisco, Paris, and Sydney.

Utilizing the power of our very own Nintex Platform, we were able to achieve our goal of standardizing data across these events and transforming a process that traditionally takes days, into one that spins up results in just minutes.

Challenge: No Standardized Method for Data Collection

Typically in a World Tour series of events, each local office handles the details of planning, running, and collecting data on the event taking place in their region. This operating model results in each region having completely different methods of gathering data, each with varying degrees of complexity and reusability.

My team required a solution that all regional Nintex offices could adopt quickly and easily in order to standardize the data collection process across the Nintex World Tour. Standardization of this data can provide extremely helpful analytics that will allow us to continuously improve our events and provide even more value to our attendees.

And because we like to get the most out of our automation technology, we aimed to build a solution that not only collects accurate data, but also automates the analysis of data and the creation of a post-event report.

Solution: The Nintex Platform

Our Nintex World Tour solution makes use of many features in the Nintex Platform, including Nintex Workflow Cloud, Nintex Hawkeye, Nintex Document Generation and some of the platform’s many external service connectors. The simple, yet powerful interconnectivity between these components allows us to automate the data handling process simply and fluidly.

Data collection

The first step was to create a workflow that is triggered to start when an attendee fills out a public form. Once the attendee hits ‘submit’, the workflow automatically sends the form data to the necessary environments for storage (we opted for SharePoint), and analysis using Nintex Hawkeye.

nintex workflowDrawing a random winner

When a Nintex World Tour event has concluded, someone who has submitted a feedback form is randomly selected to win a prize. For this stage, we used the ‘Call a web service’ action to make an API call to a random number generation site (the same result could also be achieved through a custom connector action with Nintex Xtensions).

To present the winner, we designed a website that externally starts the workflow to choose a random winner when ‘Generate Winner’ is pressed. When the workflow ends, it sends the winner’s name to the webpage to display. The aim of building a webpage was to make the “contest” more engaging than just announcing the winner via email.

nintex world tour

Power BI analytics report

The next step to gaining actionable analytics on the Nintex World Tour was to build out the report using Nintex Hawkeye as a data source in Power BI via an OData URL. We also added multiple choice questions as a percentage of total submissions. The entire process of building a functional report was extremely quick and easy, and now my team can visualize the data and drill down into the trends and patterns that emerge from event feedback.

Post-event report generation

Our usual method of reporting on Nintex World Tour events includes an overview page with a summary of all events, and a separate page for each question on the feedback form. We matched this format in our Nintex Document Generation template. We defined the basic layout and color scheme, then substituted any text and fields for DocGen tags.

There are some stats that the user needs to fill out when completing the form but any further information, as well as the totals populated in the bottom row, is calculated automatically by the workflow.

We chose our DocGen output file type to be the same as input (PowerPoint) because it is easy to go back and add qualitative information to PowerPoint slides after the report is generated. The quantitative data is automatically populated by the Nintex solution when the Power BI charts were embedded.

nintex world tour

nintex world tour

 

Achieved: Streamlined and Standardized Method to Analyze Event Feedback

In just a few easy steps, my team was able to take a previously disjointed, time-consuming, and inaccurate process and transform it into a reporting solution that is convenient, easy, and powerful.

Instead of wasting time trying to organize all of our data around the Nintex World Tour, manually try to make sense of the numbers, and generate an end report for each and every regional event, we decided to eat our own dogfood and automate the process. Now, we can get a real-time overview of the data in SharePoint, Power BI, and any other environments we may wish to leverage. We now have a solution where standardized data is collected and analytics reports are automatically generated for each region.

All the heavy lifting is handled by the Nintex Platform, meaning we can focus on the important task: Actioning the data we’ve collected from past Nintex World Tour events in order to deliver the best possible experience for attendees at future events.

 

The Nintex World Tour might soon be stopping in your city! Keep an eye on updates to the event schedule here.

 

 

Samuel Short

Originally from the United Kingdom, Samuel Short is a recent addition to the Nintex family as a sales engineer intern working out of the Melbourne office in Australia. As one of the technical resources for the region, Samuel loves building out automation solutions using Nintex in order to show that traditional processes can be made easier. Outside of work, he enjoys programming, art, and traveling.